davepress:

kierongillen:

beckycloonan:

Little comic about how to make zucchini bread in these trying times. Dedicated to CB Cebulski, Mike Hardin, Ming Doyle, and anyone else who sunk my zucchini bread deep within their bodies.

Becky Cloonan is something like a Phenomenon. 

This is awesome, and making zucchini bread is on our agenda for today. I’m very excited for it. 

brianmichaelbendis:

BATMAN: BLACK & WHITE #1 (June 1996)
"TWO OF A KIND" By Bruce Timm

(Source: thecomicsvault, via catiebat)

"Love and peace are on hold."

20th Century Boys, Volume 4, by Naoki Urasawa

catiebat:

luxdalloway:

andillwriteyouatragedy:

guardians of the galaxy + text posts (x)

In this episode of “Must-See or Misogyny:”

I saw Guardians of the Galaxy yesterday…

The overarching storyline was a nod to the classic 80’s Sci-Fi/adventure genres (think Star Wars meets Indiana Jones, with Andy Dwyer in for Harrison Ford), with a kick-ass, old-school soundtrack and awesome CGI. But I gotta say that I was really disappointed in the female character development in this film:

Every. SINGLE. female character in this movie was written in to be a prop for some member(s) the male cast: to prove Quill’s man-boy, commitment-phobic Casanova standing; to highlight the Collector’s power and control over other living beings; to be the “damsel in distress” and allow the main -male- hero to save her; to end up in some catty “girl-fight” where the only “strong” female characters are immediately pitted against each other, even though they’re “sisters,” as soon as each of them chooses opposing men to side with…

Not to mention the subtle sexist undertones throughout the film, including casual references to using women as sexual objects, making a point to have Quill “forget” the name of his one-night-stands, and overt degradation of the one female hero figure in which the super misogynistic men are allowed to call her things like “whore,” but they’re “great guys” because they defend her when OTHER people call her those things…

Ugh. Why can’t movies just be ok?!?

should’ve had more glenn close.

also lux, i’m not sure those are exactly “subtle sexist undertones.”

Is this a joke? Is this seriously what passes for critical thought among the average moviegoer?  It’s exactly this kind of apophenic, over-simplified dialogue that makes real feminist/progressive critics look bad, especially in light of real offenders like the Michael Bay Transformers series that are outgrossing GotG.

brianmichaelbendis:

Green Arrow #33 by Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Marcelo Maiolo

brianmichaelbendis:

Green Arrow #33 by Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Marcelo Maiolo

(Source: uncannypanels)

dshalv:

Pretty in-depth analysis of MOON KNIGHT #5

Excellent analysis of comic form.

Anonymous said: Female Thor? Seriously? What's next, are you going to create a black Iron Man or reveal that Rogue's mother is transgender?

brevoortformspring:

Yeah, because those ideas would be horrible! Can’t we go back to the days when everybody in comics was a white dude (except for a few girls who swooned and fell over a lot)?

Also, black Iron Man? 1982.

What’s next, a gay Canadian joining the X-men? A black/Latino Spider-Man?  Surely ideas that will never be popular…

Anonymous said: how much money Marvel gets the Pentagon to create ideological propaganda in your comics?

brevoortformspring:

Apparently, we’re getting all the money that should have gone to teaching English in your school system.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

(via davepress)

Tags: comics

comixology:

Suicide Squad comics on sale now through 7/14!
Superman by Moebius

Superman by Moebius

brianmichaelbendis:

Superheroine on the Phone by Jaime Hernandez

brianmichaelbendis:

Superheroine on the Phone by Jaime Hernandez

(Source: comicblah)

Now they just have to stop letting editorial dictate stories and maybe they’ll get some of the respect and goodwill they’ve lost.

Tags: DC comics

"Regarding single issue sales: they are incredibly important to a lot of Image creators. On Rocket Girl, it’s by far the biggest chunk (of course, we don’t have a tpb yet). And every reader counts. A few thousand copies can make or break a series. If Rocket Girl dips into the 8000s, we’ll start thinking about when to wrap it up. If it stays above 12,000 we can do it forever. At 12,000 copies I can make as much writing Rocket Girl as Hulk; Amy Reeder can make as much penciling/inking/coloring as she would on Batwoman. 8000 vs 12,000 is a significant difference in percentage, but it’s not a huge amount of readers. A lot of Image creators are in the same boat, albeit their individual line might be a bit higher or lower. Certainly collected editions and digital and ancillary media/merchandise contribute as well. But a lot of making creator-owned work is down to financing: and single issues have the biggest impact on cash flow–and the only impact on cash flow for almost a full year when you take into account early production to ‘get ahead’ as well as solicitation. Also: your comment forgets artists, who are forgotten way to much nowadays. A writer can maybe juggle 4 simultaneous projects, but an artist can do just one book at a time. It is much harder for an artist to make the plunge into creator-owned–so consider that when choosing what to support."

Brandon Montclare in comments at The Beat

Reblogging because the economics of creator-owned comics are of interest to me, and because this is the kind of thing I should probably take into account when it comes to who gets their comic pre-ordered, who gets shelf picked, and who gets trade-waited.

(via knitmeapony)

…some of my casual wisdom…

(via bmontclare)

(Source: northstarfan, via indiecomics)

Magic Player In Need

markrosewater:

The 17-year old daughter of a longtime Magic player and Wizards of the Coast employee was hit by a car walking home from school last Thursday and is critically injured. The doctors do not believe she will ever walk again.

The family has set up a donation site to aid them in this time of crisis. If anyone might be able to financially help them, please take a look at the link below:

https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/78s4/mariah-s-medical-fund