dilfgod:

I hate when people say money doesn’t buy you happiness. it does. it buys you financial stability, a nice house, nice cars, nice vacations and trips, healthier food, a better education, etc. like wearing burberry while driving around in an audi would probably make me pretty happy too. but it’s just that rich people often take their comfortable lives for granted and end up being spoiled and ungrateful for what they have 

What a crock of shit.  Whoever originally posted this is a fucking entitled twat and so is everyone else who agreed with that person.

If you define happiness by “nice house,” “nice cars,” “nice vacations,” or wearing burberry while driving around in an audi,”  you’re just shallow and materialistic.  I spent the past year working customer service/content writing for this e-commerce business and I was more unhappy than when I was unemployed. All I did was trade the stress of financial uncertainty for the stresses of spending 40 hours a week keeping some rich asshole rich while dealing with asshole customers and getting yelled at by my bosses.

Sure, I was able to buy stuff, eat more often at nice restaurants, and build a decent computer, but that isn’t real happiness. And thanks to lack of time and energy, I was forced to give up things that actually made me happy like seeing my friends, reading, writing, speech and debate coaching, etc

Of course, having money can make your life easier, but that’s not the same thing as being happy. Doing the things you love and being around people you care about makes you happy.

Anonymous said: Does it bother you when the fans don't like the way you've interpreted a character? (Assuming the reasons don't have anything to do with the character being in some way offensive)

kierongillen:

Not particularly. Or rather, it doesn’t bother me any more or less than any other reason for disliking my work. It actually doesn’t actually happen very often, perhaps surprisingly.

When it does, it’s normally for one of a couple of reasons.

1) They have an idea how the character should be which isn’t how the character is currently being presented in the universe I’m writing. 

2) I’m explicitly trying to do what I think of as character improvement/repair/synthesis on something that simply isn’t working (or is going to limit the character down the line) and they’re in love with the previous take.

An example of the former might be (say) Iron Man or Cyclops (or many of the other X-men). An example of the latter may be (say) Loki, Wiccan or Sinister.

For both, I’m prepared for them. For the former, it’s the job. For the second, I clearly disagree or wouldn’t be doing it. Clearly, I’m hoping I can talk as many previous fans as possible around to what I’m doing, but I know that’s never going to happen 100%.

I do okay.

For all people bashing his Young Avengers run, just because it’s not more of what Allan Heinberg did.

uncannypanels:

Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men #2 by Chris Claremont, Jon Bogdanove, Terry Austin, and Glynis Oliver

(via catiebat)

withgreatpowercomesgreatblowjobs said: Dear Mr Bendis. I wanted to ask a question regarding the beginning of a career. I'm 17, and want to be become a comic writer myself. My major query is; do I need a University (I'm English) degree to be a comic writer? Did you get a degree, or have you heard of cases of people who have made it without having one? I have two B's in English Language and Literature GCSE, and I know how to make a story. I have spoken to another writer, and he told me it was not necessary. Thanks for your time

brianmichaelbendis:

I attended the Cleveland Institute of Art for five years… though I did not complete my training as I had already received a contract to make comics and decided to pursue that instead of finishing my degree.

 nobody in this business cares about your academic achievements, all they care about is your ability to tell a story.

now it is my belief that you need academia to achieve at least a large part of that goal..   there are very few people who are rain man like comic book savants that can teach themselves everything they will need to pursue this business. 

 on top of your academia you need to make storytelling part of your lifestyle. you need to write every day. no matter what. you need to purge all of those bad, semi-amateur pages out of yourself so you can get to the good ones.

 everyone you admire in this world, in whatever walk of life, has done this. they have practiced every day. they don’t feel like a complete person unless they do it every day

Anonymous said: What are your thoughts on issue-by-issue reviews of comics? Do these reviews have any discernible impact on an sales (i.e., do poor reviews translate into poor sales)? Should such reviews be done of trades instead so that a whole story arc is covered? Seems to me that most of the reviewers are not very insightful anyway. E.g., Newsarama's reviews of Silver Surfer have been consistently tepid even though it's a fantastic book. Reviewer's beef with the first issue was with the coloring!

brevoortformspring:

From what I can see, most reviews have no great impact on the sales of a given title by themselves. In aggregate, it’s possible to see an effect, but only in a “Rotten Tomatoes” situation where every review is similarly damning or similarly laudatory.

I’ve lamented a number of times about how I wish that there was a better standard of review available somewhere. Most of the reviews that I read aren’t what would typically be considered reviews at all—they’re more like blog postings. Not a lot of genuine critical faculties or technical knowledge or analytical thinking is applied to most reviews, it seems. They all come down much more simply to whether the reviewer liked the book or not on the most surface level.

There’s nothing wrong with any reader expressing their opinion, but I’d love to see reviews that set a higher standard. In those cases, when a reviewer’s word comes to mean something, comes to stand for something, then the reviews can have a chance to affect their readers more readily and to affect sales. You can see this with certain storied reviewers and critics of film and prose and television. And I’d love to see the same for graphic fiction.

davepress:

kierongillen:

beckycloonan:

Little comic about how to make zucchini bread in these trying times. Dedicated to CB Cebulski, Mike Hardin, Ming Doyle, and anyone else who sunk my zucchini bread deep within their bodies.

Becky Cloonan is something like a Phenomenon. 

This is awesome, and making zucchini bread is on our agenda for today. I’m very excited for it. 

brianmichaelbendis:

BATMAN: BLACK & WHITE #1 (June 1996)
"TWO OF A KIND" By Bruce Timm

(Source: thecomicsvault, via catiebat)

"Love and peace are on hold."

20th Century Boys, Volume 4, by Naoki Urasawa

catiebat:

luxdalloway:

andillwriteyouatragedy:

guardians of the galaxy + text posts (x)

In this episode of “Must-See or Misogyny:”

I saw Guardians of the Galaxy yesterday…

The overarching storyline was a nod to the classic 80’s Sci-Fi/adventure genres (think Star Wars meets Indiana Jones, with Andy Dwyer in for Harrison Ford), with a kick-ass, old-school soundtrack and awesome CGI. But I gotta say that I was really disappointed in the female character development in this film:

Every. SINGLE. female character in this movie was written in to be a prop for some member(s) the male cast: to prove Quill’s man-boy, commitment-phobic Casanova standing; to highlight the Collector’s power and control over other living beings; to be the “damsel in distress” and allow the main -male- hero to save her; to end up in some catty “girl-fight” where the only “strong” female characters are immediately pitted against each other, even though they’re “sisters,” as soon as each of them chooses opposing men to side with…

Not to mention the subtle sexist undertones throughout the film, including casual references to using women as sexual objects, making a point to have Quill “forget” the name of his one-night-stands, and overt degradation of the one female hero figure in which the super misogynistic men are allowed to call her things like “whore,” but they’re “great guys” because they defend her when OTHER people call her those things…

Ugh. Why can’t movies just be ok?!?

should’ve had more glenn close.

also lux, i’m not sure those are exactly “subtle sexist undertones.”

Is this a joke? Is this seriously what passes for critical thought among the average moviegoer?  It’s exactly this kind of apophenic, over-simplified dialogue that makes real feminist/progressive critics look bad, especially in light of real offenders like the Michael Bay Transformers series that are outgrossing GotG.

brianmichaelbendis:

Green Arrow #33 by Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Marcelo Maiolo

brianmichaelbendis:

Green Arrow #33 by Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Marcelo Maiolo

(Source: uncannypanels)

dshalv:

Pretty in-depth analysis of MOON KNIGHT #5

Excellent analysis of comic form.

Anonymous said: Female Thor? Seriously? What's next, are you going to create a black Iron Man or reveal that Rogue's mother is transgender?

brevoortformspring:

Yeah, because those ideas would be horrible! Can’t we go back to the days when everybody in comics was a white dude (except for a few girls who swooned and fell over a lot)?

Also, black Iron Man? 1982.

What’s next, a gay Canadian joining the X-men? A black/Latino Spider-Man?  Surely ideas that will never be popular…

Anonymous said: how much money Marvel gets the Pentagon to create ideological propaganda in your comics?

brevoortformspring:

Apparently, we’re getting all the money that should have gone to teaching English in your school system.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

(via davepress)

Tags: comics

comixology:

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