Anonymous asked: Because girls never exclude other girls or never exclude guys by claiming "safe space," right? Jesus christ, I get that you have a daughter and you're looking out for her, but that doesn't mean that women have it any worse than guys now that you're focusing on one. Wake the fuck up. What sex drops out of school at great rates? What sex has the highest poverty and suicide rate? What sex is less likely to get into college? Men. So stop being a mouthbreathing white knight.

ruckawriter:

I love when righteous indignation hides behind anonymity. You poor, poor boy. You are beyond wrong, and that you cannot see why, that you cannot see how the made-up data you cite itself is part of the problem, is part of the bias, only makes me pity you.

You’re a coward.

You’re exactly the problem I’m describing.

And you have no leg to stand on. I am tired of you, I am tired of your type.

Good luck with what I am sure will be a long and miserable life.

Calling him out on his bullshit like no else can.

Tags: Greg Rucka

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

(via deantrippe)

sequentialsmart asked: Do you think it's possible for an artist create touching, meaningful art if they lived a life without tragedy? While I haven't had an ideal life, I'm still the product of a privileged, middle-class, suburban life that's never been exposed to the horrors of war, violence, addiction, abuse, sudden deaths of loved ones, or any of the tragedies that have befallen the great artists. While I feel incredibly lucky so far, it feels the best art in our history came from some very broken people.

brianmichaelbendis:

Have you not felt heartache? have you not been betrayed? have you not been disappointed by life?

have you not been in love? have you not been loved back?

 everyone feels pain and joy. everyone has tragedy and triumph. of course living in a free country with unlimited opportunity is a lot better than not but it doesn’t take away from the fact that we all have the full range of experience and emotions in our life.

and if you are in touch with them you can write about them.

 and if you are in touch with them and can write about them then other people will know them to be honest and true because we have all felt those things no matter where we are from

And, by the way, you don’t have to have them inside your house to not have been affected by the horrors of war, violence, addiction, abuse or anything like that.

So not one, but two of my favorite writers responded back to me!

sequentialsmart asked: Do you think it's possible for an artist create touching, meaningful art if they lived a life without tragedy? While I haven't had an ideal life, I'm still the product of a privileged, middle-class, suburban life that's never been exposed to the horrors of war, violence, addiction, abuse, sudden deaths of loved ones, or any of the tragedies that have befallen the great artists. While I feel incredibly lucky so far, it feels like the best art in our history came from some very broken people.

ruckawriter:

Absolutely. I wish I had the mental wherewithal right now to do a web search for the essay Joyce Carol Oates wrote on this very subject several years ago (I think it ran in The New York Times Magazine, but I could be mistaken), where she took on the whole “suffering artist” topic as an extension of an American/Puritan ethic.

Look, everything I say about writing is my opinion, and only that. I am an authority on my own work, barely, that’s all. But I firmly, absolutely believe that good writing rises from two, intimately connected, places: empathy and honesty. The extension of the argument “write what you know” — when taken literally — means that we shouldn’t have fiction. But that’s not what it means, at least, not for my purposes; rather, it’s write what you know to be true. That’s an emotional truth, a universal truth. Certainly, experience of trauma and other hardships will provide insight into those things, will, perhaps, provide an access into writing about them that others cannot achieve. But to deny imagination, empathy… that’s utter nonsense.

I will not deny that there are some beautiful, powerful works brought to us by some very damaged, tragic souls. But I do not — I can not — believe that personal suffering on a Grand Scale is required to create meaningful or lasting work. I do not, and cannot, believe that we must “suffer for our art,” if by suffering for our art we mean exposure to the cruelest and most inhumane experiences imaginable. Anyone who has struggled to put the right words on the page, the right line on the canvas, the right shape cut into the marble, etc… they have suffered for their art. They needn’t become heroin addicts to then prove it.

I’m sure there are many who will disagree with me. But from where I’m sitting, it’s your voice, your ability to imagine, to empathize, and to relay those things that connect us all with honesty and courage that will create great art.

Maybe it’s self-serving to reblog my own question, but it’s something that I, and I bet many others, have been wondering about.

Tags: Greg Rucka

thecapncummings asked: On the whole internet troll subject what do you think is the best avenue to combat this whole thing? I'm not a fan of complaining about it maybe just being positive and promoting good behavior? I've been taught being a good example is always best. Thoughts?

brianmichaelbendis:

Just be the best version of yourself, use playground rules, you don’t fight with bullies, you don’t get in the mud,  

as a good friend of mine reminds me every time someone in this business takes a swing at me: you don’t punch a pile of shit because all that will happen is you will get shit on you

 I just wish that the larger higher profile forums would take a much harder stance on what they allow on their message boards. I am all for free speech but hate speech, rape speech, and general negativity on your forums is creating an unfriendly and frankly inaccurate atmosphere.

 as I have said on this tumbler I have met women who have admitted to me that they have to pose as men on some higher profile message boards so they can have a decent conversation about comics without being Internet pawwed.

 I have told the people who own these boards and they have done nothing about it because they’d rather have the traffic even though I think the traffic would be higher if people were allowed to have a conversation without being bullied or harassed.

all I can do is not cooperate with those sites anymore.  and I do not.  for which it has been explained to me I am perceived as a pain in the ass. oh well.

comixology:

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Congrats to imagecomics, mattfractionblog, kellysue, zdarsky, jordiecolorsthings, aleskot, fionastaples, Brian K Vaughan, Jonathan Hickman, ruckawriter, nickdragotta, nickpitarra, prettydeadlycomic, Emma Rios, johnnyrocwell, kurtiswiebe, Michael Lark, Santi Arcas, and anyone else I may have missed!

Frank Miller, The Dark Knight Returns.  Some very nice composition on this page.

Frank Miller, The Dark Knight Returns.  Some very nice composition on this page.

beckycloonan:

"He rode no more to the wars…"

beckycloonan:

"He rode no more to the wars…"

coolpages:

Marc Spector: Moon Knight #30 (Marvel Comics - September 1991)
Writer: J.M. DeMatteisIllustrators: Ron Garney (Pencils) & Tom Palmer (Inks)

coolpages:

Marc Spector: Moon Knight #30 (Marvel Comics - September 1991)

Writer: J.M. DeMatteis
Illustrators: Ron Garney (Pencils) & Tom Palmer (Inks)

"The message that we send when we don’t represent the broader culture in our stories is that ‘You are other’. As a community, as an organism, it is a thing that makes us ill. It is actually bad for us."

— Kelly Sue DeConnick (kellysue) , speaking about the continuing need to diversify the kind of characters that appear in comics, as part of the ECCC panel—Broadening Comics Readership. (via robot6)

(via wilwheaton)

gingerlandcomics:

Right now on the Study Group Kickstarter you can pre-order the print edition of my comic Haunter, plus some new Farel Dalrymple and the new Study Group Magazine

(via spx)